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Dive Travel Photographs from the Solomon Islands

Once my camera gear was discombobulated and thoroughly cleaned, it was time for me to have a proper look at my images from our recent 4-week stint in the Solomon Islands. Here’s a small selection of my favourites…

Diver and Upright Shipwreck

This tuna boat hit the reef straight on, sinking back down the wall and resting perfectly upright. Posing for me is the ever-patient Doug—we waited an hour for this set up to be ‘just right’.

Underwater photograph of a scuba diver exploring an unusually orientated shipwreck in the Solomon Islands

Nikon D300, Tokina 10-17mm fisheye, Subal housing, 1/60th @ f5.6, ISO 400, natural light

School of Batfish

These friendly fish (Platax teira) were facing into the current, hovering above a cleaning station.

Underwater photograph of a school of batfish / spadefish (Platax teira) hovering together in the current

Nikon D300, Tokina 10-17mm fisheye, Subal housing, 1/125th @ f8, ISO 250, two Inon Z240 strobes

Juvenile Anemonefish

This guy was tiny, and swimming around with infinite energy. Instead of trying to follow him around with my lens, I framed a section of his anemone and waited for him to swim into it.

A tiny juvenile anemonefish peeks out from amongst the many anemone tentacles of its home

Nikon D300, Nikon 105mm macro, Subal housing, 1/160th @ f22, ISO 200, two Inon Z240 strobes

Swirling School of Jacks

This school of jacks (trevally) are resident at Mary Island. My dive buddy Jan swam around behind the school, and the fish parted to form a window—just for a moment. Magic.

A scuba diver swims through a huge, swirling school of jacks / trevallies in the Solomon Islands

Nikon D300, Tokina 10-17mm fisheye, Subal housing, 1/125th @ f6.3, ISO 200, two Inon Z240 strobes

Christmas Tree Worm

This is a tube worm that uses its feathery gills to catch plankton in the passing current.

Underwater macro photograph of a Christmas tree worm, a kind of marine worm

Nikon D300, Nikon 105mm macro, Subal housing, MacroMate, 1/160th @ f22, ISO 200, two Inon Z240 strobes

Hairy Squat Lobster

Lauriea siagiani, a tiny crustacean that lives among the outside folds of barrel sponges.

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Nikon D300, Nikon 105mm macro, Subal housing, 1/125th @ f22, ISO 200, two Inon Z240 strobes

Diver in Leru Cut

Sharon posing in Leru Cut. This cut stretches 60m (200’) from the reef into an island. At the end of it you can surface and look up the rock wall into the jungle canopy. Very Indiana Jones.

Underwater photograph of a scuba diver hovering in between two walls of an underwater cut / crevice.

Nikon D300, Tokina 10-17mm fisheye, Subal housing, 1/100th @ f5.6, ISO 320, natural light

WWII Plane Wreck

Jean-Bernard checking out this wreck. Kinda deep, and shocking viz, but worth seeing.

Underwater photograph of a scuba diver exploring the wreck of a WWII fighter plane.

Nikon D300, Tokina 10-17mm fisheye, Subal housing, 1/100th @ f8, ISO 400, two Inon Z240 strobes

Clam Detail

I’m a sucker for abstract textures, and coral reefs have them in spades.

Underwater macro photograph of a clam's mantle, with gold spots.

Nikon D300, Nikon 105mm macro, Subal housing, 1/200th @ f14, ISO 200, two Inon Z240 strobes

Mirror Pond

This one’s of Doug at a site called “Mirror Pond”. You swim into a cave, which then opens up to the jungle. There was a crocodile swimming around on the surface at the other end of the cave; Josh was filming it, while Doug and I gave them a wide berth.

Underwater photo of a scuba diver looking up at the light beams that filter through the water. Solomon Islands.

Nikon D300, Tokina 10-17mm fisheye, Subal housing, 1/60th @ f5.6, ISO 400, natural light

Traditional Dancing

Some topside shots to finish up. This is at one of the villages we visited. Beautiful traditional singing and dancing. This lady’s mouth is stained red from chewing betel nut.

Beautiful traditional singing and dancing. This lady's mouth is stained red from chewing betel nut

Floating Market

Almost every day there were several dugout canoes at the ship’s stern. The locals brought fresh produce to sell.

Two indigenous women sell vegetables from their dugout canoes, Solomon Islands

Fresh pineapples

Bought buy our ship’s crew. Our dive ship travelled to some very remote areas, and the passing trade was welcomed by the villagers we met.

Many fresh pineapples for sale in the remote villages of the Solomon Islands

The Gang

Some of the best shipmates and dive buddies you’ll ever meet. Thanks for coming with us and making this such a wonderful trip!

asd
—Liz

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Jules Glennon

These shots are incredible, Liz. As one of those on this trip, I can say that the standard of photos taken by the the other shipmates is very good and comes down to the photographic and video workshops and advice that you and Josh deliver on these trips. The Solomon’s is a spectacular dive location and superseded all my expectations, thanks to your ever-reliable choice of expedition locations!

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